The SD-WAN Adoption Curve Brings IT Choice
by September 1, 2017

Filed under: Industry Insights, Networking Technology

The adoption curve for technology (what Gartner calls the Hype Cycle) is interesting to watch for various products. As SD-WAN matures, we start to see differentiation between products and types of deployment. This story has a useful breakdown of the SD-WAN choices IT teams can make, whether they install it on-premises only, in a cloud-enabled way, or a cloud-enabled way with an on-site option. Cloud-enabled SD-WAN will work well for businesses already using some applications in the cloud. And it’s worth noting that while cloud-enabled SD-WAN with an on-site option is a great idea, it’s not available now from many vendors. That’ll probably be one area of development from providers.

On the topic of on- and off-premises IT, this piece about IT maintenance focuses on unified communications, but the tips are useful for plenty of product areas. IT maintenance may be easy to overlook, but no less important, when workloads are delivered from the cloud. Some of the reasons to pay close attention to maintenance include better security, better use of IT’s time and lower TCO. Proactivity is also a nice benefit of maintenance (which, to us, is driven by monitoring). It’s a win all around when IT can spot problems or potential issues before users do.

One item IT can work on with all this newfound time saved with technology is communications, says one expert. This story has some excellent advice for IT leaders with ideas they’d like to carry out, but haven’t yet gotten business buy-in or budget. Keep any meetings with business leaders higher-level to avoid too much technical detail that may be over those leaders’ heads. Talk in their language, which means creating a project plan and listening carefully to get a sense of the business issues at stake.

Technology has become such a component of our daily lives that there are a lot of details to consider for those responding to the flooding in Houston. Fleets of drones—perhaps the largest yet deployed—are helping AT&T survey its cell towers for damage. Drones are also helping insurance and oil and gas companies survey damage. In Dallas, the city’s CIO is working with providers to set up new networks and add capacity for the expected influx of people displaced in the Houston area. The 200-person IT department for the city has also been helping various agencies to make sure they’ve got the needed hardware to serve those coming to Dallas.