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    Categories Industry Insights

Business Technology Is Where Innovation Really Happens

Contrary to popular belief (and the exciting buzz of CES), it’s business technology, not consumer, that really drives innovation, says the Aberdeen Group. They name the PC, IoT and early BlackBerry business use as innovative tools that started in data centers and IT departments before moving into wider consumer use. They see the concept of SDN as the next “boring” business tool that will transform consumer usage and the economy.

As we ease into this new year, predictions still abound. This CIO column looks at the less-discussed tech trends as 2017 starts. For example, BPaaS—business process as a service—is an emerging trend to help enterprise teams get a handle on the many tools and technologies in play. It’s really a response to the changing economic model that cloud presents. The goal of BPaaS is to take away some of the mundane tasks and allow IT and other teams to focus on core business goals—just like cloud is doing too. For more on how IT can work with business processes, sign up for our upcoming webinar: How to Become a Cloud Broker.

And on the automation front, this recent McKinsey report on automation finds people and technology working together will be the best recipe for success—something many in IT likely already know. As we noted last week, human error causes nearly half of network problems, but we humans are still awfully necessary to run businesses. McKinsey’s report found that new types of automation technologies can increase productivity, though gains are still very small: They expect that automation could raise productivity growth from 0.8 to 1.4% annually…by 2065.

This colorful infographic from Hybrid Hive reflects the state of hybrid IT around the globe today, with nearly 80% of respondents to the corresponding study agreeing that hybrid IT is inevitable. Other findings show that most respondents expect that their cloud budget will increase in the next three years—very good news for the IT teams who’ve been dealing with flat budgets. And while survey respondents do still worry about security and loss of control with the cloud, they’re still adopting cloud services.

Christine Cignoli: Christine Cignoli is a technology writer based in Boston. She's written about storage, data center infrastructure, virtualization and enterprise apps for more than ten years, and has a master's in publishing and writing from Emerson College.