Browsing posts written by: Geoff Gerrietts

Pycon 2016

PyCon 2016 Wrap Up
June 15, 2016 by

Company News, Industry Insights

Several members of the TraceView team just got back from PyCon 2016.  We saw a lot of great talks there and we wanted to highlight some of the especially awesome and notable ones.   To start with, we can’t help but mention the two great talks given by AppNeta folks: Geoff Gerrietts gave a talk
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PyCon 2015 Wrap Up
April 15, 2015 by

Industry Insights, Performance Monitoring

The AppNeta team has just returned from a fantastically fun, edifying, and exhausting weekend at PyCon 2015. PyCon was held in Montreal this year, giving team members the opportunity to brush up on their French, binge on poutine, and absorb the many fabulous talks given by this year’s speakers (including our very own development manager,
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Performance Analysis as Performance Art: my experience speaking at PyCon 2015
April 14, 2015 by

Industry Insights, Performance Monitoring

Sunday afternoon, I had the pleasure of addressing my largest audience ever on a topic very dear to my heart. With each talk I attended, my anxiety increased: it was once again a fantastic conference filled with tons of exceptional talks. I fretted with my slides almost daily, making very few substantive changes but staring
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Designing Babel: Leveraging Polyglot Architectures
September 9, 2014 by

Performance Monitoring

The story of the Tower of Babel is one of western civilization’s earliest cautionary tales. Encoded in its telling, we find the earliest known argument against polyglot architectures. The plethora of languages, the argument states, impedes productivity and detracts from the oneness of the people. In fact, there’s very little argument against polyglot programming or
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DRY Mockery in Python Testing
May 29, 2014 by

Industry Insights, Performance Monitoring

Note: the code referenced in this post, along with some extra context, can be found on github. I have tried to link into the repo at each of the inline code samples, for convenience. It might be useful to refer to the repo as a whole, though, rather than just the swatches under discussion. When
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Writing Purposeful Unit Tests
April 11, 2014 by

Performance Monitoring

Several recent blogs have discussed unit testing, some of them in considerable depth. One of my favorites is Jeff Knupp’s entry, which is a comprehensive look at how to write and understand good unit tests. Jeff touches on the motivations for testing, but like most other writers, moves on quickly to the details of actually
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Being Nothingness: Comparing to None in Python
January 27, 2014 by

Performance Monitoring

The “is None” Idiom Consider these two snippets from PEP-0008: “Comparisons to singletons like None should always be done with is or is not, never the equality operators. Also, beware of writing if x when you really mean if x is not None — e.g. when testing whether a variable or argument that defaults to
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Loading up some Big Queries
December 5, 2013 by

Performance Monitoring

Google’s BigQuery service has a lot to offer for organizations with massive datasets to query against. Rented massive parallelism is much more cost effective than trying to set up the infrastructure to do it yourself. BigQuery has some limits, though — flexible boundaries that your design needs to accomodate. At AppNeta, our naive approach to
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Stacks of Cache
September 18, 2013 by

Performance Monitoring

Everyone likes cache. How can you not? In countless cases, you can remediate performance problems quickly and cheaply by adding a cache layer to your stack. It’s like bolting a nitrous oxide system onto your tricked out street racer, or throwing dry leaves on your campfire. Immediate, obvious big performance difference, teeny-tiny investment of effort.
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